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big changes in the public schools. our chief education correspondent rehema ellis is in detroit tonight after an all day conference as part of our education nation initiative. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. detroit is like a lot of cities struggling with budget deficits and closing schools like the one behind me. proposed shut-downs in chicago are more and bigger than any city has ever attempted all at one time. outrage intensified as word spread. 54 public schools in chicago are slated to close at the end of this school year. >> my child has been here since he's been going to school. >> it's so sad to think that they are all going to be separated. >> reporter: the city is working to address a $1 billion deficit and says the closures could save $560 million over ten years. before it can save it has to spend. $223 million to reconfigure the schools absorbing new students. >> this policy is racist, classist and we have to continue to say that our mayor who is away on a ski trip drops this information right before spring break. this is cowardly. it's the ultimate b
's not without the controversy, but the budget cuts that are from educators to parents about the morality of corporate advertising in schools is certainly causing a stir. yet, filling the financial shortfall is the biggest prem fa prem-- problem facing schools today. and he needs funding. >> american public education is in financial crisis. >> he heads up education funding partners, a colorado firm that matches it with schools looking for cash. >> they want the right partners and the right controls, our model gives them that control. >> over the years more schools have been turning to corporate sponsors for much needed revenue. they struck a deal with staples in exchange for ads on the district's website and a supply list containing a coupon and kids got to attend the science enrichment program. >> it's really about selling anything, it's about allowing companies to come in and partner for a good cause and public education in responsible ways. >> there are aggressive campaigns out there buses and playing fields becoming common. for some districts it's what keep the doors open. critics arg
care reduction. no, no wants to do that. and no one wants to eat our seed corn. investment in education, investment in infrastructure, investment in sign b scientific research in order to keep narrow loopholes open, reductions if you move the business overseas. no, they don't want to debate that. but now we have a budget. because of the leadership of the chair of the budget committee and the members of her committee -- and, by the way, this is no -- this is not a small group of democrats. it runs from our most liberal members to our most conservative members, all united around the budget that is fiscally responsible. it meets the gramm-rudman -- i mean, i'm on old guy -- the simpson-bowles constraints, budget target. it invests in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he p
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
of education creating and filling a new job and pays six figures. and washington correspondent byron york joins us and the reason is, this is probably after the sequestration. >> it is, it's the white house initiative on educational excellence for african-americans, it was created by executive order. >> greta: the president did it. >> he created it himself, by the president last year. it was placed in the education department, pay is about $124,000 a year and it's just been filled. >> greta: after march 1st? >> after march 1st and sequestration takes effect. what you have when you have the czars or coordinators or whatever you want to call them, it's an admission that the federal government has a lot of programs that are spending a lot of money that aren't well-coordinated and aren't working together well and the president feels he needs to appoint somebody to do that. right there it's kind of an admission the whole system is a little bloated. >> greta: after everything else is cut march 1st and when he created by executive order we knew sequestration was likely to happen within six or seven mo
so frequently face discrimination in everyday life. in all aspects of their life. from education, employment and health care, to all of their social relationships. as a result it's harder for them to stay healthy, to get health care insurance coverage, and to get the health care they need. here at cap we are leveraging implementation of the affordable care act help eliminate barriers that keep the and transgender people in the with hiv from achieving the highest animal health care needs, health care that they need. in particular, our lgbt stated change project is working in states across the country to support better data collection, better consumer protection, comprehensive and reliable insurance benefits, and a successful implementation of the medicaid expansion. when you look at the affordable care act, you know, those on the right complained that it is a bit of social engineering. and what it really is is trying to ensure that we cover all americans and provide them with good coverage. we should also look at the aca as an opportunity to expand basic rights for the lesbian, ga
to them. >> a lot to them if you're trying to piece together a college education, not large in terms of the big picture, but because of the sequester, the department of education said that these grants are cut and new grants are cut by 38% across the board. anytime a new grant if it was $5,000 before, it's about $2,000 less than that. >> greta: here is what i don't get. this is almost 40% cut. and 38% cut. explain if the sequester was 2.4% cut across the board, why are the young people taking it at 38%, this cut? how, i would think they would have 2.4%. two things going on the. one it's spread over a shorter period of time. we're halfway into the fiscal year so that 2.4% cut has to actually go into effect over a shorter period of time. >> greta: make it 4.8 or 4.8 then. >> the other thing, there are things in the sequester that are called off making sure the men and women in afghanistan and iraq themselves aren't in harm's way. and vast majority of military spending not cut. so when there are programs that are targeted they take the disproportionate chunk of the hit and that's the po
. >> the bright orange color of prison jump suits, how it's being used in the latest battle over education funding here in california. morning, brian! love your passat! um. listen, gary. i bought the last one. nice try. says right here you can get one for $199 a month. you can't believe the lame-stream media, gary. they're all gone. maybe i'll get one. [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. you can't have the same car as me, gary! i'm gettin' one. nope! [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> new at 10:00, a proposal for dramatic change in how california funds public education. a group of supporters rallied behind the governor. they used costumes to make a point. >> reporter: julie, they did. they correspondenced up as prisoners, and tied these orange bands, saying change, not chains around supporters arms. they say it's time for california to reverse the trend of spending more on prisons
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
education, because i feel that if we educate ourselves, the more we educate ourselves, that we can overcome poverty. and the fact that if we do it as a community, and we stick together, we bond together, we support one another, with education, with health, then we can start to fix some of the issues at the root of the cause. and so we can erase, we can erase families who are struggling to get by on minimum wage. we can erase the drug abuse that we see on the streets and in the home. we can erase the gun violence and the domestic violence, and we can start to bring attention to mental illness. but this can only be done if everyone in the community is invested. so i think it has to be a position that we all take in which we say, yeah, take better care of yourself, yeah, go for your prescreening to make sure that you don't have any ailment that can be detrimental to you down the road. we also can then turn to our youth and our adults and say, "it's okay to get educated on these matters, it's okay to do well in school, for the young person that's in school. it's okay to achieve and be academica
're losing, our children are actually being indoctrinated in the education system. this teacher's union, they are teaching our kids the liberal philosophy, and if we could infiltrate the educational system and the media, we would probably have a better chance. host: and how do you use that? what changes need to be made in order to do that? are you not happy with current conservative outlets that are out there? caller: i would actually pay for the education from some of these conserve tizz so they could get into the school system. host: carl from martinsville, west virginia, with another call there at home this morning. here's a story from the "usa today", a few other stories we wanted to point out to you. relatives kept on campaign payrolls. an investigation that "usa today" did, 32 members of congress dispensed more than $2 million in campaign funds to pay relatives' salaries during the 2012 election cycle, a "usa today" analysis at the most recent campaign record shows. law makers have hired their children, their spouses, aunts, parents, and in-laws as consultants, account acts and re
on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much the way all our conversations went. it is not thinking i would be getting christmas cards or anything else from him. i was not as a retired part of it is that got the strong impression when i would run into him that he viewed me as evil because of the gun issue. he had very strong opinions on the. [inaudible] [laughter] i'd found something on the gun issue he disagreed very strongly about and he viewed me as e
california funds public education. a group of supporters rallied behind the governor. they used costumes to make a point. >> reporter: julie, they did. they correspondenced up as prisoners, and tied these orange bands, saying change, not chains around supporters arms. they say it's time for california to reverse the trend of spending more on prisons than on public education. >> they are students, but today, these teens played the role of inmate. some bay area schools would see a boost in spending, if governor brown's new public school funding plan is approved. >> the current formula set up isn't equitable, and isn't fair. >> known as the local control funding formula, the governor wants to give schools money, based on need. >> for us, this is significantly better. >> for example, districts such as oakland, with large numbers of disadvantaged students, and english language learners would receive more money per student. >> certain districts have a demographic that calls for more investment, because there are students that need more help. >> reporter: troy flint welcomes more control, and f
're given opportunities to fully participate and take advantage of higher education opportunities and that's what the issue is here. this is distinct from fisher vs. the university of texas. >> neil: the argument could be in michigan they said we addressed this grieve vances in inequalities and it's not an issue anymore. >> that's exactly right sandra day o'connor, the last case that was herd, she said in 25 years this may not be necessary, but in the states that have passed these laws, michigan being one of eight -- have decided it's not necessary anymore. the laws giving previous rep shall treatment based on race, ethnicity is not necessary. >> is that the state usurping the federal government? >> that's the argue. >> in california the appeals court has upheld this, which is another reason why the supreme court is going to hear it. you have two pel las courts with different decisions. >> you look at the history. seems as if this is -- was an inorganic movement. you had one of the architects, a big supporter of the california proposition that heather is referring to, who came on out and s
are not cheap. steve, the directer of the narc institute for early education research at rutgers was consulted by the white house. there's a number, estimated, one the president's plan, that early childhood education could cost up to $10 billion a year, rick. this goes in the line of more spending, more recovery. this is a lot of money. >> well, yeah, but here's the concern. i don't know how you can make the argument that 800,000 civilian defense workers losing their jobs can be good for the economy. i don't quite see how that's possible, and now on spending on preschool, look, what we're looking at now, forget the president's agenda to increase it. we're now looking at a major cut to head start because of the sequester. i don't know if that impacts on the economy today, but you can't tell me this is a good thing for the future when we take away the programs for kids. >> bottom line is, literally, barack obama needs more revenue. he needs another source. he just raised taxes on the risk, talking about closing deductions which is not enough. i'd like to predict they will eventually put another
. it would be an enormous gift to mcconnell. >> sean: a gift. >> really, okay, let me educate you about a recent poll. because clearly you don't-- >> tamara is it possible for he you to educate me? >> i know, you know it all. opponents two-one. he's like a crypt keeper, he won't go away. >> sean: like the former klansman who used to head up your party from west virginia. >> you, two, mcconnell isn't doing anything. nobody likes him. whether you like ashley judd, or not. -- >> tamara, tamara, i will bet any amount of money if ashley judd runs against mitch mcconnell in kentucky, she will not be a senator from the state of kentucky-- tennessee, i'm sorry. >> and left leaning, a left leaning pollster currently has mcconnell leading all. and a left-leaning pollster. >> because she's incredibly polarizing. some of the things she said, it was unconscionable to breed. >> sean: unconscionable to breed. >> because there are so many starving children. and has a problem with a father giving away a daughter at the wedding. >> sean: keep going. >> a problem with christianity because it legitimizes m
think would probably help the city a lot more focusing on education and focusing in terms of economic development. you know, i just have to say -- >> of course his argument is this is critical of a critical public health issue and people who smoke cost millions if not billions of dollars a year. >> but again, sort of return on the time you're going to spend. given the fact that it's not like it is going to stop people from buying vigts. i mean, they can still walk in and purchase them. i just think it is an interesting use of his time and i have to say that i think the city would be better served if he focused on education as opposed to this. >> doug, the head of the new york association of convenience stores is not happy about this. here's what he had to say about it. we think it's patently absurd. can you think of any other retail business licensed to sell legal products that is required to hide them from the view of its customers? he right? >> well, i think that's because the tobacco industry spends about a billion dollars in direct marketing toward -- they make payments to these c
to make their own decisions and to get an education, and to get a good job, to worship god in their own way, to get married, to raise a family, the same is true of those young palestinians that i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza, that's where peace begins, not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. not just in some carefully designed process but in the daily connections that sense of empathy that takes place among those who live together in this land, and in this sacred city of jerusalem. [applause] >> and let me say this as a politician, i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. [applause] >> ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things. i know this is possible. look to the bridges being built in business in civil society by some of you here today. look at the young people who have not yet learned a reason to mistrust. or those young people who have learned to overcome a lega
) we weren't educated properly about the drugs. (woman) we are get told that it's bad for you and you don't hear anything else. (man)and yesterday we got into trouble because of (woman) there's no alternative like fair trade, or ethically friendly cocaine yet so we don't have a choice. >>yes, western societies have to take responsibility for the high level of demand in their er, amongst their citizens. if you're a cocaine user, you can either, confront the fact, and acknowledge that the commodity you buy comes from a dirty trade and has real ramifications down the line, or you can say well, to your governments, give me a legitimate way to buy this substance. people will always take drugs. we just need to manage that phenomenon in a way that is the best for society. [ music ] >> bill: hey, good morning, friends and neighbors. and a happy wednesday. wednesday, march 20th. great to have you with us here on the "full-court press" on current tv. wedge to the program. welcome to your program where you get to not only find out what's going on around the world here in our nation's c
the insurance they need or the subsidies they need to get educated. she is trying to gain sympathies here for rich preppy white house staffers that need to pay $7 for a nice meal in the cafeteria in d.c. and now they want to raise it to $10. is that what i'm getting from her? >> clayton: she says the quality of the food. if you look at the quality of the food, even lowering it it's still better than the school lunches most of our kids get to eat across this country. >> alisyn: you mean mystery meat? [yuck] >> peter: what was that pink slime they had coming out of tube. >> clayton: we used to have cheese dream take hamburger bumps the enriched flour ones break it in half and drizzle cheese ton and melt it and that was lunch. >> alisyn: that sounds delicious. the food i had in my cafeteria completely indefinable. it was just a sort of. >> clayton: jell-o. >> alisyn: gentlemen -- gelatinous. i think it was a kung pow chicken thing. let us know what the most heart breaking sequester cut you have heard is find us on twitter. are you on twitter? the neys are 49. without objection. >> the senate
was a very educational show. we found out phish is starting a new album tomorrow. that's breaking news. and i got to look at my friend james bennett without a beard and i've got to say -- >> no, don't. >> he looks younger. he looks younger. don't you think? >> it's usually what he says. >> he looks younger. >> so i was asking you what made adam so great, editor of "new york" magazine. >> my boss, my friend and i think arguably the greatest magazine maker of this moment, of the last decade or so. >> he knows how to give a magazine a voice. very important. >> and visually. >> we had a lot of "new york" magazine people on today. >> and what a great cover story. >> knocking it out of the park. >> if it's way too early, what time is it, mike? >> well, it's time for "morning joe." but right now it's time for our ole pal crystal izz acht. >> i need a fix. ♪ i'm going down." >>> president obama's middle east tour treks on just hours after militants fire rockets out of gaza. >>> big moves back in washington as paul ryan's budget gets said for a vote in the house and vice president joe biden says the
find something pretty big in the department of education. we'll tell what you is up there. >>> a manhunt is underway after a prison director is gunned down in cold blood in his own home. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums martha: this is a possible big setback for gun control advocates. senate majority leader harry reid says that he is dropping the assault weapons ban part of this which is really what we've been talking about all along. dropping that from the senate's gun control package. i'm joined by senator scott brown who is not at all surprised by this action. the former u.s. senator and fox news contributor joins us now. senator, good to have you with us to america's newsroom. >> thank you very much. martha: a lot of people talked about the big talk on sought weapons ban and it was so important to be passed. now it is not in the bill and been deleted. >> he is particular harry
service educated them about return policies, there is a bit of sidewalk research in the marina. after all, he heard the recall of black pants will reduce full earns by 27 cents a share. >> i pay attention to the bend over test, yes. >> i haven't seen any of these sheer pants. >> reporter: chad sheaf reminded us yogis are a calm bunch. >> come into yoga, some people wear less than that. they have holes in the wrong places sometimes. >> reporter: how is that for transparency. no mistake. >> now if you have a transparent pair you can get store credit or a full refund. you don't have to bend over to prove your point. these are -- >> we'll check it out. >> these are not see-through. >> they're famous pants and the company ceo announced today new quality control measures and changes to their sourcing methods. >> thank goodness for that. >> we can breathe a sigh of relief. >> that is a huge story. a lot of people have e-mailed us thinking they had to bend over to, you know, verify the fact that you could see something there and it's been, you know, a source of consternation for a lot of folks. >
of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. looks like we bothave a lot of catching up to do. well, visit pbskidsgo.org, where you can play a lot of games for your favorite characters, and win votes, too. well, go ahead, what are you waiting for? guys, i've been training -- i'm sorry. this is totally a blooper. (laughing) marcus... (laughter) >>> this is "nightly business report." >> moving higher. stocks finish on an up note. still on track for the best quarter in 15 years. >>> water, water not everywhere. how the on going drought is hitting texas especially hard and how it may get worse. >>> and too late or not? why there is still time to refinance your mortgage but you may not want toait much longer. all that and more coming up right now. welcome to our viewing. >> investors were back in the buying mood as stocks bounced back but still closed lower for the week. the dow snapped the streak of four straight winning weeks and the s&p 500 logging the second losing week in 2013. the markets got a lift on optimism out of cyprus combined with a batch o stronger tha expec
police tweet- a-thon. it's meant to educate the public about policework and promote social media as a law enforcement tool. police have been tweeting for the past two years. they say it's been a big help when they need to get information out quickly. >> twitter has been a great asset for us. it's saving time. it's allowing us to view more with less resources on a regular basis. >>> right now, nine bay area police departments participated in today's tweet-a-thon along with two others. >>> a meteor streaked over the east coast. witnesses from florida to maine spotted the fire ball at 5:00 our time. the american meteor society is receiving hundreds of reports of sightings and of course social media is a buzz as well. there are unconfirmed reports the meteorite landed near the border. >>> this is becoming epidemic. we have to stop these meteors. >> if you can figure out a way, you would be a very rich man. >> as long as they don't do any damage. >> until they hit you. nay are they are beautiful in the sky. you can see the stars. you can see the moon. the skies are so clear out there. over
, good job, good education. >> ama: police say they've decided not to charge the man with the crime since he admitted to being behind the fake attack. >> let's get to leigh glaser who is checking our weather. >> leigh: it will be changing next week, but until then, enjoy it. live doppler 7hd right now, not picking up much in the way of moisture, and we're starting to see high clouds and you've probably been noticing them move across the bay area. this i a live shot on the embarcadero in san francisco, very mild. oakland, 66. santa cruz, 65. looking out over the bay, accept rosa, 67. 69 in fairfield and los gatos, 70. folks, here's a look at our forecast highlights. we'll continue with high clouds and clear sky in some location so get ready for cool temperatures. mostly sunny, passing clouds, mild tomorrow and then showers will entry -- be introduced. lows tonight, east bay locations. where you're clear, temperatures bottom out near 40 degrees, and some high clouds will stand near half moon bay and towards palo alto, with temperatures in the mid-40s overnight. high pressure, a springlike d
. joining me now is karen lewis. with a welcome, i know your biggest concern, aside from a good education for these kids are your teachers of which a thousand could lose their jobs. let's talk about the timing of this. you have chicago mayor rahm emanuel. he did issue the statement over the past decade. this decision was delayed while we put more money into keeping buildings open rather than investing it where it should be, in our children's education. now we'll be able to better use funds for our children's future. >> i think it's a lovely talking point. and this is what this mayor does. he uses rhetoric that sounds reasonable. but if you unpack it, you find out that first of all, in this so-called billion dollar deficit, which of course is the press release deficit, it always changes later on. the actual amount of money this will cost, especially, if it's done correctly, which god forbid they've never done anything correctly before in terms of school closings. this will cost almost a billion dollars itself. so i don't believe any of this. rahm emanuel doesn't know the truth if it would
's a situation that's out there. we will see what happens with the cases. >> jamie: businesses and educators are coming together to keep cash-strapped schools open. but not everyone's on board. critics i say kids are getting the short end of that deal. [ male announcer ] let's say you pay your guy around 2% to manage your money. that's not much, you think. except it's 2% every year. go to e-trade and find out how much our advice and guidance costs. spoiler alert: it's low. it's guidance on your terms, not ours. e-trade. less for us. more for you. with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid-smart. droid-powerful. ♪ i want a weed free season, that's how i roll ♪ ♪ so i reach for roundup extended control ♪ ♪ with the all-new, no pump, one-touch wand ♪ ♪ it kills weeds dead and keeps weeds gone ♪ [ whip cracks ] ♪ roundup extended control ♪ i just spray them weeds, then spray them cracks ♪ ♪ the weeds are gone, and they won't be b
and educate the people in pakistan? the administration has the power and ability to make it right. but this program is not reinstated, i'm going to introduce legislation to withhold nondefense foreign aid from pakistan until this wonderful program for our troops is fully funded. >> brian: he will introduce the bill in a few hours. we gave pakistan $12.7 million for education last year, a quarter of the tuition help needed for the marines. >> anna: in a stunning new report on mammograms, researchers saying 60% of abnormal mammograms turn out not to be cancer and they can lead to unnecessary surgery or biopsy. this is taking a serious mental toll on some patients. women who received a false positive report that they have anxiety and depression three years after learning that they're cancer free. >> steve: meanwhile, here is a story you'll be talk being all day. tv anchors are supposed to be ready for anything that they read on the teleprompter, right? >> and we do have some breaking news to report to you. fox 54 has just learned that a huntsville news anchor is being proposed on liv
and women who served the best health care, the best educational opportunities, and the best job available. they deserve nothing less. it is my hope that this reckless and shortsighted decision will mark a turning point in american history and that that we will never again wage an unnecessary war. we must use all the tools of america's power in resolving disputes, including diplomacy. we must have sufficient congressional debate. we only debated this go to war resolution probably a couple hours. we need more debate and oversight before ever putting another u.s. soldier in harm's way. finally, mr. speaker, just like in iraq, there is no military solution in afghanistan. we need to bring the war in afghanistan to an accelerated end and to bring our troops home now. dr. martin luther king jr. in expressing his sentiment during a different war said, the bombs in vietnam exploded home. they destroy the hopes and possibilities of a decent america. let us put this decade of perpetual warfare behind us, invest in our veterans, our children, and get about the business of nation building here at hom
a conflict in vietnam to research the history. >> that's right, and assuming they're educated, assume they had some education on the vietnam war. how do you miss it? and a b-52 bomber is in a park with a plaque on it. i mean, you have to be an idiot to miss that and so, i'll then say about the young producers they may not have lived during vietnam, but idiotic to have done something like that. >> megyn: the plaque on site talks how the american empire was destroyed and it's unambiguous once you get the translation, i assume, what exactly this stands for and why it was memorialized in the way it is, the wreckage on site. i want to ask you about the overall show, bob, because it wasn't like this is a singular incident in the amazing race episode where they went to vietnam. there was another instance they made the contestants memorize the lyrics to a patriotic vietnamese song and pro communist song and here is some of that, stand by. >> this requires them to watch the performance of a patriotic vietnamese song and they'll reveal the words of a celebrated quote. ♪ >> like one direction
any educator would try to justify any terrorist attacks against the united states that killed 3,000 innocent americans. it's not just this one question. she also says that the test had some other issues as well that talked about whether food and medicine and shelter were rights or responsibilities. her son got that one wrong as well saying it was a responsibility. that it's not the government that should be in your lives making sure there is shelter over your head, making sure you have food on the table, medicine to keep you well and health care essentially. she says this is the american dream that i believe in. that's what i've been trying to teach my kids and this test is going against it. >>brian: it was on facebook and now has become a huge story. an update on that fox news alert. a shooting in quantico, virginia, where a suspected shooter killed two marines and then killed himself. sherry ly joins us live with the details. when did this happen? >> this happened at 11:00 last night at the officer candidate school. we're told that the gunman and the two victims were all activ
of various scenarios, how things can be handled. a few, what is happening? caller: i am in education, and we have civilians students and military in the same classes. of theworking options next go around of not having civilians in the classroom because they cannot be in there for five days a week. we are looking at all the different options, have to spend a lot of tried -- time. host: let's hear from another federal worker, a democrat in virginia. good morning, michael. say godi would like to bless america and c-span, and thank you for being here. i would like to say, the sequestration is going to have a big affect up and down the east coast, from here to texas, that firstpan into the early and second quarter of next year. work, psychologically, i see people slowing down. you know, inlike, a grip, waiting for some thing to happen. i have friends and other agencies, and other parts of virginia and places. i just see the intensity. cut ofu throw in the almost $10,000 for me, for 22 days, you add the payroll tax, i am looking at a setback of -- or a contraction of 13,000 dollars or $14,000 this
, they won't suffer harm. but if they want to give their kids a home education through home schooling, they will be jailed. they would have severe fines. that is what happened before. every family who wants to home school is persecuted in the same way. the justice department is saying that the fines and the jails -- that's not persecution. >> shannon: it's a fact that the police did show up and take the children and force them to go to school in 20 06, when the family was there in germany, electing to have them at home. the obama administration basically said that their experience is the reason they had trouble in germany was because they refused to comply with the law. how could you say it was ever religious persecution, if you are disobeying the law because of religious beliefs? >> that's right. the religious persecution is defined similarly to our constitutional principles. if the law's unconstitutional. if the law violates human rights, have you an asylum claim. if germany wasn't banning home schooling, there wouldn't be an issue and it it wasn't a human rights issue, there wouldn
on the state, education, general fund. >> new york and california, 100 percent goes to education. most of it is to -- pennsylvania all to senior citizens. veterans affairs, that teach thing. there are some states, like rhode island, where it can go into the general fund and the state can use it as its session. as i said, they have plenty of things to spend it on now. >>heather: so, do you think more states will consider having the lottery? >> they don't have any money. they are either going to raise taxes which is not popular at all or cut spending and they are doing all of those things. this has proven to be such a huge money maker for states. it's $20 billion more in just a few years they is earned. it is a lot of money. >>heather: you mention the payout of $4 2 billion in prize money and that was included because we were all offer it, and the payout included $587 million powerball jackpot in 2012 and now we have $338 million and already this year in 2013. >> but the winners do not get all that money. uncle sam takes his and it depends whether you take a lump sum. 80 percent choose t
in any u.s. city. supporters of the decision say it makes sense financially and will improve educational opportunities for thousands of children. but opponents, many of them outraged parents, don't see it that way. and they're vowing to fight it. george howell is following the story. former chicago-based correspondent. this is a tough one because there are a lot of folks feeling very impassioned about this and not clear whether it's the right thing to do. >> the thing about it, there's still a lot that's not very clear about what will happen. what we know is this, fredricka, the third largest public school system in the country, so this is going to affect thousands of kids once we hear which schools will be closed. and secondly there's a big concern, fredricka, that this will affect mostly p lly predomy african-american communities. again, we don't know which schools or which areas will be closed, but that's the big concern right now. as you mentioned, this is reportedly going to list some 50 schools that will be closed described as underutilized and underresourced schools. >> does that
positive. that israel is an economic hub. the palestinians are among the most educated populations in the worldful there is great potential here if these two opposing sides would actually work together. that's why he has been stressing economic development as a possibility. >> now a $40 billion a year mutual trade relationship that dennis ross helped nurture along. thank you, dennis, and i should say nbc middle east adviser in chicago, jeffrey goldberg here. we'll be right back. no. there was that fuzzy stuff on the gouda. [ both ] ugh! when it came to our plants... we were so confused. how much is too much water? too little? until we got miracle-gro moisture control. it does what basic soils don't by absorbing more water, so it's there when plants need it. yeah, they're bigger and more beautiful. guaranteed. in pots. in the ground. in a ukulele. are you kidding me? that was my idea. with the right soil... everyone grows with miracle-gro. ♪ the middle of this special moment and i need to run off to the bathroom. ♪ i'm fed up with always having to put my bladder's needs ahead of
their tax money going for that. >> i understand. we have a firm stance this is an important educational event. the decision maybe made. it's out of our hands now. we have to move forward. >> bill: all right. so your your educational sex week stuff about how to protect yourself, about responsibility. about, maybe, what the right and wrong of it is, as far as we're americans and this is how we should treat each other, i think that's fine. but, the how-two stuff. i think i would have charged admission for that a couple of bucks and not had any private money going to that. any public money going to that. just do that privately on the side. so, if people want to see that kind of stuff, they pay for it. would that have been unreasonable? >> yes. that would have been unreasonable. i disagree because we submitted a survey that many over 500 of our students filled out. and we provided programming based on their survey. and we're providing student fees. >> >> bill: you are telling me that the taxpayers of american should be beholden to college kids to pay for what
more humanitarian assistance and basic services including education for syrian children so far from home whose lives have been upended. and i think as parents we can only imagine how heartbreaking that must be for any parent to see their children having to go through the kinds of turmoil that they're experiencing. our cooperation on syria's an example of how the partnership between the united states and jordan improves the lives not only of the jordanian people but peoples across the region. so, again, your majesty, i want to express my great appreciation for our partnership. and i want to thank you and the jordanian people for the friendship and hospitality that they've shown me and to my fellow americans. and just as i visited the citadel here in amman, i'm looking forward to seeing petra tomorrow, weather permitting. one of the great wonders of history that the world can experience thanks to the care and dedication of jordan and its people. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you, your majesty. >> i will ask you -- are you going to keep open for the syrian refugees. next to you is
of things simultaneously and trying to educate ourselves, if you will, truly it's a fact-finding mission for us right now to determine what that background consisted of and where that leads us is yet to be known. >> all right. and then now a finally all colorado corrections facilities are under lockdown through the weekend. so is that just a precaution or are you concerned there could be more violence? >> well, i can't speak to the increased security that the department of corrections is exercising at this point. obviously they have to make sure that they do their own asse assessment and what they feel might be remaining risks or not and make decisions accordingly. and then we recognize that amongst various executives across the state that's something that we're actively engaged in in terms of providing additional security from our perspective. but we realize that because there is no conclusive, you know, ending to this case yet, it's unknown on whether or not there is a remaining threat or not. >> lieutenant kramer, thank you for taking the time. the latest information we have from texa
of the health education committee, this is not just a veterans issue, it is an issue for the entire nation, but we have in terms of mental health providers. these long wait times that i mentioned are partially caused by staffing shortages. i am pleased that secretaries hassecchi -- shinsechi applied to hire more mental health conditions. as of the 13th they fired more than3000, including more 1100 of these new mental health clinicians. this is good progress towards reaching their goal. emphasize this point, i am very concerned that va has hired only 37 clinicians in the last two months. i understand the challenges. i think we all understand the challenges. you do not walk down the street and get the first person. you want to make sure the person you are hiring is well-trained and of the quality that the veterans deserve, but clearly the va must step up hiring if they intend to meet their goal of 16 new clinicians by june of this year. they will be attempting to meet over 500 in the next few months and i do not see how that is possible. we do want to talk to the va about how they are moving
please, please educate yourself, educate your family, go out and get tested. and that's what the name of the game is. go out and get tested. >> joy, the stats on minority communities and how just wildly disproportie porgportionately t affected by this. getting tested is is a huge part of the puzzle. but also so is getting treatment. we've been talking about obama care and what it does, it extends preventive services, free ones to 71 million americans and yet this weekend, there's a concerted effort to unwind obama care. not through broad strokes, but the republican strategy at this point seems to be death by 1,000 cuts, unwinding funding, doing things to make it more difficult to extend the insurance exchange. when in reality. this is still an epidemic in the black community, still an epidemic, globally as well. no one is speaking out for the good things that obama care is doing and the very important services it's extending to minority communities and nonminority communities. >> to say nothing of governors who are rejecting the medicaid expansion. which is the only way people got hea
a complaint that led to a federal investigation by the department of education into how the university handles and reports rape cases. what do you think the investigation is going to find here? >> they're going to find there is a pervasive culture of sexual assault where the university is acted with deliberate indifference. >> reporter: if an administrator tells a student rape is like football, what does that tell you about the culture here? >> well, i'm not going to comment on any specific case but i think that it absolutely needs to be the case that our administrators respond in a way that is supportive and fair to all the parties involved in these incidents. >> reporter: holdon thorpe is the chancellor of unc. the federal probe comes amid new outrage on the chapel hill campus over a case before the student run honor court. a young woman unsuccessfully sought punishment for an exboyfriend she claims sexually abused her. instead, she ended up facing honor court charges of intimidation. what do you say to these women who say that the system here filed them? >> well, we're supportive of our stu
shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing potatoes for generations. irish potato consumption waned during the economic boom as irish tastes changed. the youngest generation of this family look for new markets and started a new business. gourmet potato chips called crisps here, kettled in small batches. after 18 months, they're selling in europe, asia, and to high-end american grocers. food was noted again and again by the experts as an export sector where ir
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